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01 Jan

AMSTERDAM — For 60 years, the Sal Meyer deli in Amsterdam has been serving kosher foods like its signature pekelvlees, a fatty corned beef steeped in meat juices and served with a bun.

The deli is one of the few kosher restaurants left in Amsterdam, a city that once had such a vibrant Jewish community that it still retains the nickname Mokum, the Yiddish word for “safe haven.” People travel from miles away to meet their friends there, and the deli holds a small community together in a country where 80 percent of the Jewish population was killed during World War II.

AMSTERDAM — For 60 years, the Sal Meyer deli in Amsterdam has been serving kosher foods like its signature pekelvlees, a fatty corned beef steeped in meat juices and served with a bun.

The deli is one of the few kosher restaurants left in Amsterdam, a city that once had such a vibrant Jewish community that it still retains the nickname Mokum, the Yiddish word for “safe haven.” People travel from miles away to meet their friends there, and the deli holds a small community together in a country where 80 percent of the Jewish population was killed during World War II.

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